The Procrastinate-Busting Power of Podcasts (Yes, Podcasts Can Bust Procrastinating)

Hi all,

as you may be aware, I recently finished National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo). Last week, I wrote about my experience here. NaNoWriMo was a success for me, not simply because I wrote the 50,000 words necessary to “win”, but because I created (most of) the first draft of my middle grade WIP.

However, NaNoWriMo did take its toll. By the time I hit 50,000 words on 27th November, I was exhausted. My brain felt like a fried egg and I fell into a literally heap.

I may have won NaNoWriMo but I had lost my will to write any more of my NaNo work.

I could think of nothing worse.

A break was needed. A distraction, something to recharge my enthusiasm for my project.

So for the next week, I mindlessly surfed the biggest distraction of them all: the internet…

procrastinating…

one day after the other…

…until I stumbled upon a podcast guest hosted by an agent I met during last year’s trip to New York City for the Writer’s Digest Conference.

This agent’s insightful feedback and advice struck a cord with me then, and has remained with me since, so I was interested to hear what he had to say. In this podcast, he spoke about what makes characters entice a reader to read past the first few pages: who the characters are, how they got to where they are, what they want, and what stands in their way. It was all stuff I’ve heard before but, for some reason, hearing it again from him had a profound effect on me.

My brain woke up. It was like my characters knocked on my head yelling, “Hey, what are you doing? You heard him. We have so much more to say. Your characters are your book. Get writing!”

The podcast reignited my interest in my project.

Now I’m a huge fan of podcasts on anything to do with writing, whether that be on an aspect of the craft itself, on the business and marketing front, or as a guest speak with one of my favourite authors. There’s something special, almost intimate, about podcasts. It’s as though the speaker is only talking to you.

And in our time-poor world, their ability to educate, inspire, and empower – whether you’re on the commute to work, or while you cook, clean, or exercise – makes them a fantastic multi-tasking means to an end. We all get stuck at times with our writing but by listening to podcasts, at least you feel like you’re doing something about it. Well, don’t you? And maybe one might just be the thing you need to get moving again.

The Write Life recently updated their list of  twenty inspiring podcasts for writers. If you haven’t introduced yourself to the world of writing podcasts, this is a good place to start for a bit of binge-listening 🙂 (Or if you’re in a literally heap 😦 ) And my favourite of the Australian podcasts is the Australian Writers’ Centre So you want to be a writer podcast, with Valerie Khoo and Allison Tait.

Hopefully, you’ll hear something on one of these gems to pull you out of any procrastinating slump.

And fulfill your writing goals.

Until next time,

Happy writing,

Rebecca

Are you a fan of podcasts and, if so, which would you recommend to writers, and why?

And have those who NaNo’d this year been able to maintain momentum after December 1st hit?

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4 thoughts on “The Procrastinate-Busting Power of Podcasts (Yes, Podcasts Can Bust Procrastinating)

  1. Hi Rebecca,
    Welcome back to the land of “recovered writers!”
    Surviving NANOWRIMO reminds me of completing the famous South African Comrades Marathon (the 89-90 km race between Pietermaritzburg & Durban.) Several runners often complete the race only to collapse at the finish line with heat exhaustion!
    Glad the podcast revived you!
    I have one pet peeve with some podcast—they last too long. I much prefer to read the transcription, which takes me less than the often 57 minutes! Darren Rowse from problogger (a fellow Aussie to you) succeeds in being more succinct—he sticks to 19-20 minutes!
    Indeed, The Writer Practice has neat posts and training material and a splendid writer’s community, which I’ve joined recently.
    Thanks for sharing and success with completing your WIP!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi, Danie. Yes, I view NaNoWriMo as a marathon of the brain, with similar peaks and troughs of energy and willpower during the event, and complete exhaustion, pride, and relief at the finish line!
      I usually don’t mind the length of most podcasts, as I tend to listen to them while undertaking other tasks, but I see the benefit in shorter episodes as well! You know, I never read the transcripts instead. The beauty of podcasts for me is the sound of voice, that intimate conversational feel. The Write Practice is a good recommendation too!
      Best of luck with your writing, Rebecca

      Like

  2. Pingback: 2017 – the Year I Accelerated my Leaps of Faith – Rebecca Chaney

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